Nutritional Analysis – Guest Post

by Erin, The $5 Dinner Mom on November 14, 2008

Jenna, from Kid Appeal, has agreed to do a nutritional analysis on one of our recent meals. She is a nutrition enthusiast and has LOTS of secrets to share about getting your little ones to eat their greens and proteins.

“What�s good for the body in Pork with Apples and Pears?

Apples contain fiber and vitamin C. They contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. Insoluble fiber acts like bran, grabbing LDL cholesterol (bad kind) during digestion and removing it from the body. Apples soluble fiber reduces the amount of LDL produced in the liver. Apples packs a double whammy punch on bad cholesterol helping levels stay within normal ranges. Think cholesterol concerns are an adult problem? Research studies have shown that the number of kids suffering from both high cholesterol and out of what LDL levels are on the rise.

Pork contains good sources of B6, thiamin, niacin and riboflavin. Next to milk, pork is one of the few sources that contains a good deal of riboflavin, which helps in the release of energy from foods. Pork is also top on animal proteins that offer thiamin, which helps in the metabolism of protein, fat and carbohydrates. Not all pork is equal, many cuts are fatty, with sausage and bacon topping the list. Leaner cuts are best, and eat smaller portions of fattier cuts.

Good to mention here too about serving sizes for protein. Children ages 2-6 need 5 oz total of meat, beans, eggs or nuts every day. Ages 7-12, and teenage girls need 6 oz daily. Teen boys need 7 oz daily. For a frame of reference, a 3 oz portion of meat is about the size of your fist, or a deck of cards. 1 oz looks like a piece of string cheese. If your young toddler is not showing a lot of interest in meat and is also eating eggs, beans, nuts, nut-butters, you have no reason to be concerned. Keep offering meat. In time, they will get more teeth and figure out how to tolerate chewy meat, they�ll eat it. Remember to discuss adding “allergen” foods, such as peanut butter and eggs, to your infant/toddler’s diet.

Jenna Pepper is co-instructor of Kid Appeal! a Kid�s Nutrition class and blogger at foodwithkidappeal.com. She is a nutrition enthusiast, and likes to slow down from a busy life of owning a business and parenting to enjoy healthy food with her two boys and husband. Not sure how to get your kids to eat vegetables or whole grains? Come to the forum and ask a question. Want some ideas on what to offer your kids that is both good for them and good to eat? Come to the blog to get suggestions and find out what healthy food does for their growing brains and bodies.

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